Book review: The Fortunate Ones by R.S. Grey

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Brooke Davenport has just been let go from her job as an au pair.  Needing some cash while she starts a new job search, Brooke takes a job as a cabana girl at a local country club.  She doesn’t love the leers and loaded comments from creepy old men, but she does love the money – and getting paid to look at sexy billionaire James Ashwood doesn’t hurt, either.

Working late one night, Brooke finds James sitting alone at the bar. When he invites her to join him for a drink, sparks fly and they find that they have undeniable chemistry.  But James, eleven years Brooke’s senior, is looking for a commitment, while Brooke isn’t ready to settle down yet.  Can James and Brooke work out their differences, or will it all end in heartbreak?

If I’m being totally honest, it kind of pains me to write this review.  I am a huge fan of R.S. Grey – this is the sixth book of hers that I’ve read this year – but this is probably my least favorite.  Part of the blame lies with me.  I’ve been in a not-so-great-place recently and usually, I can rely on R.S. Grey’s books to pull me straight out of a funk.  Her books are typically witty, charming, fluffy, and cute.  The Fortunate Ones is none of the above.  I actually cried multiple times while reading this book, and that’s almost unheard of for me.  So I didn’t get quite what I bargained for, and that really clouded my opinion of the book.

As a lead, Brooke is perfectly fine.  She reminds me of a number of R.S. Grey’s heroines in that she’s sassy, headstrong, and focused.  She needs to find a new job as an au pair because there’s no way she’s spending the rest of her life as a cabana girl.  She’s not willing to give up on her dreams for a guy – even a guy as desirable as James Ashwood.

James is, at first glance, a respectable love interest.  He’s gorgeous, he exudes wealth, and, unlike many men who fit this description, he’s looking for a wife.  James is, however, exceptionally moody and a bit too alpha for my tastes.  (What happened to love interests like Julian Lefray?)  You see, James thinks that the best way to win Brooke over in an argument is to forcibly kiss her until she acquiesces.  He also mopes around and cuts off communication for days or weeks at a time when Brooke does something he doesn’t like.  It just didn’t sit right with me, but he does improve by the end of the book.

This was such a 180 from what I’m used to by this author.  It was good enough, but after a (mostly) solid string of five-star books by R.S. Grey, I was pretty disappointed to not love this one.  In the end, it’s a 2.5, but I’ll round it up to three.

Final rating: ★★★☆☆

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