WWW Wednesday

It’s time for another WWW Wednesday post! WWW Wednesday is hosted over at Taking on a World of Words and just involves answering the 3 Ws!


What are you currently reading?

  • Bad Blood by John Carreyrou
    • I’m about halfway done and this is crazy! This book has been recommended to me so many times and I don’t know why I waited so long!
  • Roommates by M.E. Parker
    • I’ve had this one on my Kindle forever and it’s been a very long time since I read straight-up erotica, so here we go…
    • reading challenge: firestation (romanceopoly)

What did you recently finish reading?

It’s been a very good reading week, and I’ve actually finished six books since my last WWW Wednesday!

  • Rayne & Delilah’s Midnite Matinee by Jeff Zentner
    • I really enjoyed this! I haven’t decided yet whether it’s four or five stars, which probably means four… but we’ll see.
  • Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman
    • I also really enjoyed this! I did not expect to like it since I tried three separate times to read American Gods and failed each time, but it was really good!
  • Trinkets by Kirsten Smith
    • This, on the other hand, was not so good.
  • Jealous Revenge by Octavia Singleton
    • Five stars for entertainment, one star for literary merit. A very long review is coming, but in short, this one was a ton of fun.
  • We’ll Fly Away by Bryan Bliss
    • I DNFed this earlier this year and decided to give it another chance. It’s not really my kind of story, but I can still recognize that it was well-written.
  • Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch
    • I LOVED THIS. I want to read every linguistics book ever now. I have missed having linguistics in my life.

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • Twice in a Blue Moon by Christina Lauren
    • I have had this ARC forever and I need to just do it! I saw the hardcover in B&N over the weekend and felt really bad.
  • To Be Taught, If Fortunate by Becky Chambers
    • I think the worst review I’ve ever seen of a Becky Chambers book has been like… four stars. It’s time to finally read one, and this one is super short.

Have you read any of these books? Are any of them on your TBR? Did you do your own WWW Wednesday post today? Let’s talk in the comments!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite bookmarks

Happy Top Ten Tuesday! Today’s theme is favorite bookmarks… which is honestly not my favorite topic. I’m not sure where all my bookmarks ended up in my move, so here are ten things that I like to use as bookmarks when I don’t have an actual bookmark available.


  1. the dust cover
  2. receipts
  3. appointment cards
  4. envelopes
  5. post-it notes
  6. business cards
  7. a pen or pencil
  8. junk mail
  9. scrap paper
  10. and when all else fails, I save my page number on the Goodreads app

Did you do your own Top Ten Tuesday post today? Feel free to leave your link in the comments and I’ll check it out! What do you like to use for a bookmark? Let’s talk in the comments!

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Book Review: Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson
Rating: ★★★★☆
Links: Amazon • TBD • Goodreads
Publication Date: April 17, 2012
Source: Borrowed

For fans of Tina Fey and David Sedaris—Internet star Jenny Lawson, aka The Bloggess, makes her literary debut.

Jenny Lawson realized that the most mortifying moments of our lives—the ones we’d like to pretend never happened—are in fact the ones that define us. In the #1 New York Times bestseller, Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Lawson takes readers on a hilarious journey recalling her bizarre upbringing in rural Texas, her devastatingly awkward high school years, and her relationship with her long-suffering husband, Victor. Chapters include: “Stanley the Magical, Talking Squirrel”; “A Series of Angry Post-It Notes to My Husband”; “My Vagina Is Fine. Thanks for Asking”; “And Then I Snuck a Dead Cuban Alligator on an Airplane.” Pictures with captions (no one would believe these things without proof) accompany the text.

It might be odd that I’ve now read not just one, but two, books by a blogger whose website I’ve never even visited. And yet here I am reviewing a second book by Jenny Lawson. In addition to never having read her blog, I also read her memoirs in the wrong order. But that’s not really a problem. Jenny’s life — or at least the way she tells it — is funny, and that’s all that matters.

The thing about Jenny Lawson’s memoirs is that they’re funny. Like, laugh out loud at your desk even when you’re trying to be discreet about the fact that you’re listening to a hilarious audiobook while you work. There are many stories in this book that I enjoyed, but the one that’s stuck in my memory the most is Jenny recounting her days working in HR. I’d like to say that the kinds of conversations she had to have surprised me… but they didn’t.

I enjoyed this book very much. I don’t know if Jenny Lawson is planning to publish any more books, but if she is, I’ll be over here waiting to read them.


Have you read Let’s Pretend This Never Happened? Do you follow Jenny’s blog?
Let’s talk in the comments!

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Book Review: Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl

Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆
Links: Amazon • TBD • Goodreads
Publication Date: June 5, 2018
Source: Borrowed

Once upon a time, back at Darrow-Harker School, Beatrice Hartley and her five best friends were the cool kids, the beautiful ones. Then the shocking death of Jim – their creative genius and Beatrice’s boyfriend – changed everything.

One year after graduation, Beatrice is returning to Wincroft – the seaside estate where they spent so many nights sharing secrets, crushes, plans to change the world – hoping she’ll get to the bottom of the dark questions gnawing at her about Jim’s death.

But as the night plays out in a haze of stilted jokes and unfathomable silence, Beatrice senses she’s never going to know what really happened.

Then a mysterious man knocks on the door. Blithely, he announces the impossible: time for them has become stuck, snagged on a splinter that can only be removed if the former friends make the harshest of decisions.

Now Beatrice has one last shot at answers… and at life.

And so begins the Neverworld Wake. 

Let me tell you something: I’m really sick of reading books that I’ve already read. And Neverworld Wake? I’ve read it several times. This book is a haphazard conglomeration of a lot of trends, but it especially reminded me of a few very popular YA books:

It would be fine if this book offered something new or interesting, but it doesn’t. We have the days repeating over and over again like in Before I Fall. We have the murder mystery with nobody wanting to share what they know like in One of Us Is Lying. We have the mysterious super rich children like in We Were Liars. Neverworld Wake borrows so many tropes and yet it somehow manages to do absolutely nothing.

The concept of the book is fine — Beatrice is hanging out with her old friends when a man knocks on the door and tells them that they have to decide who will live and who will die. Crazy, right? They brush it off and go on with their lives, but then they find that they’re living the same day over and over again. As the day repeats itself again and again, they try to find their way out of the Neverworld and solve the murder of Beatrice’s high school boyfriend.

The problem is that the book tries to do a lot of things and doesn’t end up doing any of them well. The writing itself is awkward, filled with ridiculous similes like “swirls of blond hair like sugar garnishes on thirty-four-dollar desserts” and metaphors like “we are all anthologies.” Like, I get what the author is trying to say, but writing like that just comes across as pretentious and unnecessary. Half the pages of this book could have probably been cut if they’d just gotten rid of all the unnecessary comparisons.

There are also continuity issues. You see, there’s a different between an unreliable narrator and forgetting what the heck you’re supposed to be writing. Neverworld Wake finds that line, crosses it, and keeps running. You can’t brush off a huge inconsistency in the plot as an unreliable narrator and just expect me to accept it. It doesn’t work like that.

I was so, so disappointed at the end of this book for multiple reasons, but one of those reasons IS A HUGE SPOILER, so click here if you want to find out what it was!So, basically, we follow these five characters for about three hundred pages as they try to piece together what happened to Beatrice’s beloved (or was he?? we may never know) boyfriend on the night that he died. They break into a police station to try to examine case files. They interrogate his family at gunpoint. They uncover a conspiracy to hide a totally unrelated murder from years before. Despite all of this detective work, at the end of the book, we find out that EVERYBODY ALREADY KNEW HOW JIM DIED BECAUSE EVERYBODY WAS SOMEHOW INVOLVED IN HIS DEATH. What a waste of my time. It’s been days since I finished this and I’m still mad.

This book was clearly not for me. I’ve heard good things about Pessl’s other books, so I might give her another try at some point. For now, though, I’m just going to move on to something that’s the polar opposite of this book.


Have you read Neverworld Wake? What’s a book that did an unreliable narrator well?
Let’s talk in the comments!

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Weekly Update

In case you missed it, here are this week’s blog posts:

I’ve been reading:

DNFs this week:

Recently acquired:

  • nothing this week!

1 thing this week:

  • Normally I push through books that I don’t like or don’t connect with, but this week I actually DNFed THREE books. It felt good. Maybe I’ll do it more often.

Song of the week:


How was your week? What’s the best thing you read or listened to? Anything interesting happening in your life? Let’s talk in the comments!

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Book Review: Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered by Karen Kilgariff & Georgia Hardstark

Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered by Karen Kilgariff & Georgia Hardstark
Rating: ★★★★☆
Links: Amazon • TBD • Goodreads
Publication Date: May 29, 2019
Source: Borrowed

The highly anticipated first book by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark, the voices behind the #1 hit podcast My Favorite Murder!

Sharing never-before-heard stories ranging from their struggles with depression, eating disorders, and addiction, Karen and Georgia irreverently recount their biggest mistakes and deepest fears, reflecting on the formative life events that shaped them into two of the most followed voices in the nation.

In Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered, Karen and Georgia focus on the importance of self-advocating and valuing personal safety over being ‘nice’ or ‘helpful.’ They delve into their own pasts, true crime stories, and beyond to discuss meaningful cultural and societal issues with fierce empathy and unapologetic frankness.

Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered might be an odd book choice for someone who had previously never listened to My Favorite Murder and had no idea who Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark were, but something about it called to me and I decided it would be a nice audiobook to listen to at work. And you know what? It was. I had a great time listening to this one and it was so much more than I expected.

Even as someone who had no background whatsoever on the authors, I really connected with this book. I thought that the authors’ stories were really interesting, but, above all, their advice to “fuck politeness” really resonated with me. The whole idea of fucking politeness is to set aside societal norms and the idea that women have to be nice and friendly in favor of keeping yourself safe. I mean, when I think about it, the number of times I’ve been in a less-than-ideal situation just because I didn’t want to offend someone is scary.

Aside from that, I appreciated all of the authors’ stories. The one about Karen’s mom’s Alzheimer’s was heartbreaking, and I loved how both Karen and Georgia encouraged doing whatever you have to do for your mental health. I’ve never really been into true crime, but the next time I go on a long road trip, I might have to listen to My Favorite Murder.


Have you read Stay Sexy & Don’t Get Murdered? Have you listened to the My Favorite Murder Podcast?
Let’s talk in the comments!

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Book Review: Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens by Tanya Boteju [SPOILERS]

Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens by Tanya Boteju
Rating: ★☆☆☆☆
Links: Amazon • TBD • Goodreads
Publication Date: May 7, 2019
Source: Borrowed

Perpetually awkward Nima Kumara-Clark is bored with her insular community of Bridgeton, in love with her straight girlfriend, and trying to move past her mother’s unexpected departure. After a bewildering encounter at a local festival, Nima finds herself suddenly immersed in the drag scene on the other side of town.

Macho drag kings, magical queens, new love interests, and surprising allies propel Nima both painfully and hilariously closer to a self she never knew she could be—one that can confidently express and accept love. But she’ll have to learn to accept lost love to get there.

Like many people, I was drawn to Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens because it sounded like it would be a great celebration of diversity and inclusion. At a 3.81 average on Goodreads, it’s not doing amazing, but it’s a pretty solid average. And I can see why people have enjoyed this book. It’s about acceptance, both of yourself and those around you. It features multiple characters coming to terms with aspects of their lives that they can’t change, from the way their parents act to their gender identities.

And I want to make it clear that I think that all of that is great. I think those are really important themes for young adult books and I think it’s even more great that this book features characters of color and introduces teens to the drag community in a really positive way. My problems with this book are in its subtler messages.

Everything from this point on may include spoilers, so proceed with caution.

Alright, so there were a few things about this book that really bothered me.

The one I’ll start with left me thinking, “wait, did that actually just happen?!” Some context: I am in my late 20s. Aside from relatives and conversations in a professional context, I have not associated with any high schoolers in almost a decade. When I was in high school, I thought I was basically an adult. I was not, and the actual adults around me knew that. In this book, Nima is seventeen years old. She befriends, and later that same night has a sleepover with, a thirty-five year old woman. Deirdre is portrayed as this really benevolent maternal figure, bestowing advice upon Nima and her friends and giving them a place to stay when they need it. I want to clarify that Deirdre doesn’t do anything illegal throughout the course of the book. But what thirty-five-year-old woman wants to go home with a seventeen-year-old girl? What thirty-five-year-old woman thinks it’s appropriate to crash on said seventeen-year-old’s couch? What parent wakes up to this and thinks, “Yeah, this is normal, let’s make pancakes?” It just felt icky and gross and set off every alarm in my mind.

The second thing I want to bring up is the message that it’s okay to be a terrible person just because you’re going through some stuff. We all know that teenagers can be terrible. I probably had my fair share of terrible days when I was a teenager. But there are some characters in this book, Gordon in particular, who are terrible about 98% of the time. And yes, Gordon is going through some stuff. He’s struggling with his gender identity (a plot point that is never really resolved, by the way) and seems to live with an abusive father (another point that is never really resolved). He’s angry at everything, he lashes out, he makes fun of people to make himself feel better, he constantly cracks jokes about Nima being a lesbian, and he’s just all-around that guy you would have avoided in high school. And yet, once Nima finds out that he’s struggling with his gender identity (he’s never referred to as trans, so I’m not really sure how to describe it other than that), all is forgiven. Gordon is allowed to be a terrible person. At one point, after she’s been hanging out with Gordon for a bit, one of Nima’s friends asks her if he’s still a terrible person. She says yes. Gordon is never really called out for his behavior, other than an offhand comment from Nima asking him to stop calling her names.

The third thing is the age difference between Nima and Winnow. It’s not nearly as dramatic as the age difference between Nima and Deirdre, but it’s still icky. As I said, Nima is seventeen. She’s in high school. Winnow is a girl that Nima meets at a drag show and falls in love with, completely forgetting her previous crush, Ginny, who she’d been constantly pining over up until that point. (More on Ginny later.) Winnow is also twenty-one years old. I have no problem with an age difference between consenting adults, but a seventeen-year-old who is still in high school should not be trying to hook up with a twenty-one-year-old who has their own apartment. Or, at least, that twenty-one-year-old should not entertain those efforts, invite the seventeen-year-old to a party, provide them with alcohol, and try to kiss them. Nima is so clearly uncomfortable hanging out with Winnow’s friends, and yet she continually tries to be cool to win Winnow’s affection. Winnow doesn’t do anything overtly creepy, and she does try her best to make sure that Nima feels included, but Nima is so out of her comfort zone that she can’t even articulate what’s wrong to Winnow and just ends up getting drunk a lot. There’s such a difference in the level of maturity between Nima and Winnow that I wondered how on earth those two thought they’d make a good couple.

The fourth thing is the book’s message that if you’re a good person, you’ll forgive everything that anybody does to you with no questions asked. I’ve talked about a lot of the more questionable aspects of this book and a few of the pretty questionable things the characters do. One of the messages of the book seems to be that the good people in your life will allow you to do bad things with no repercussions. Now, I’m a pretty forgiving person. I tend to put up with more than I probably should from the people in my life. (I’m working on that, though.) But the characters in this book are just on a different level. Get super drunk and throw up on someone you’ve just met? No big deal, they’ll just take you home with them! Make out with a girl you don’t even have feelings for just because? Totally fine, you can still be friends! Make fun of someone for no other reason than they’re gay? As long as you have your own issues, it’s all good. It’s portrayed as totally reasonable to just blindly forgive people, because that’s what good people do, and that is a toxic mentality to present to teenagers, the target demographic of this book. I am here to tell you that if someone makes you mad or does bad things to you, you do not have to forgive them. If you want to forgive them, you can, but you should not force yourself to get over things because it’s “the right thing to do.”

A subpoint here is Ginny, a straight girl who knows that Nima has a crush on her. As the book opens, Nima is crushing hard. She knows that Ginny doesn’t like girls but she also knows that her crush on Ginny isn’t going anywhere. She attempts to ask Ginny out and is promptly shut down in the nicest way possible, because Ginny is described as being the nicest person possible. Nima’s crush on Ginny mostly disappears after she meets Winnow, but makes a brief reappearance during an odd scene in which Nima is trying on clothes and requires Ginny’s assistance with a shirt that gets stuck. All of a sudden, Nima and Ginny are full-on making out in the dressing room… until Ginny abruptly pulls away, talking about how she got carried away and isn’t into girls and was just experimenting. I’m sorry, how is that supposed to be okay? Why is Ginny’s behavior never called out?

The last thing is not so much a problematic aspect, but just an annoying one: the fact that Nima falls into that typical YA trope of “beautiful girl who doesn’t know she’s beautiful.” Nima constantly mentions how she’s so unattractive, nobody could ever want her, so on and so forth, and yet every single person who meets her refers to her as “adorable.” It made me roll my eyes every time!

All in all, I wanted to love this book for its diversity and its message of acceptance, but I had too many issues with the actual content to rate it any higher than one star. I’m really disappointed in a lot of things that happen in this book and just hope that any teenagers who read it will question its more problematic aspects.


Have you read Kings, Queens, and In-Betweens? Do we agree or did you love it?
Let’s talk in the comments!

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