Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite quotes

Happy Top Ten Tuesday! Today’s topic is top ten favorite book quotes. I am actually really bad at keeping track of quotes that I love, so what I ended up doing was going through my Kindle highlights on Goodreads.  (Sorry to all the paper books I’ve forgotten about!)

Some of these quotes are funny, some are serious, and some I just really related to. Some are from books I loved and some are from books I didn’t, so this selection of ten quotes really runs the gamut.

Books were, and always would be, something a little magic and something to respect.

The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

There’s a lump in my throat. That’s another thing about me. If someone says I’m sad, or asks me what’s wrong, or tells me not to cry, it’s like my body hears: NOW CRY. Like a command, even if I’m not actually sad. But maybe there are always tiny sad pieces inside me, waiting to be recognized and named. Maybe it’s like that for everyone.

The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli

In new situations, all the trickiest rules are the ones nobody bothers to explain to you. (And the ones you can’t Google.)

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

I didn’t plan to be this dysfunctional at 27, but dysfunctionality has a way of creeping up on you. One second, you’re 22, wrapping up your undergraduate degree from a top business school, and then suddenly, you’re sitting alone in your car at 27, wondering how five years slipped through your fingers without so much as a blink.

The Foxe and the Hound by R.S. Grey

As a side note, don’t you think everyone should have to come out? Why is straight the default? Everyone should have to declare one way or another, and it should be this big awkward thing whether you’re straight, gay, bi, or whatever. I’m just saying.

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Oh god, a winky face. The most provocative of all emoticons.

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

I get angry when women disavow feminism and shun the feminist label but say they support all the advances born of feminism because I see a disconnect that does not need to be there. I get angry but I understand and hope someday we will live in a culture where we don’t need to distance ourselves from the feminist label, where the label doesn’t make us afraid of being alone, of being too different, of wanting too much.

Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

You don’t need to fit yourself into what society tells us a girl should be. Girls can be whoever they want. Whether that’s an ass-kicking, sarcastic, crime-solving FBI agent or a funny, gorgeous, witty beauty queen—or both at the same time.

Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde

Cheat on me once, shame on him. Cheat on me twice…what the actual fuck is going on? How in the world have I managed to find my last two boyfriends cheating on me? No, not together. Although, that would have been much more poetic, and at least they could have included me or something.

Scoring Wilder by R.S. Grey

We speak of moving mountains, but sometimes people can completely rotate the world, just so someone else can land upright on their feet.

Some Kind of Perfect by Krista & Becca Ritchie

2017 Modern Mrs. Darcy Reading Challenge

That’s that!  I have officially completed the 2017 Modern Mrs. Darcy reading challenge!

  1. a book you chose for the cover: Batter Up by Robyn Neeley
  2. a book with a reputation for being un-put-down-able: Infini by Krista & Becca Ritchie
  3. a book set somewhere you’ve never been but would like to visit: Seven Days of You by Cecilia Vinesse
  4. a book you’ve already read: Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
  5. a juicy memoir: Talking As Fast As I Can by Lauren Graham
  6. a book about books or reading: My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows
  7. a book in a genre you usually avoid: Damaged Like Us by Krista & Becca Ritchie
  8. a book you don’t want to admit you’re dying to read: The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee
  9. a book in the backlist of a new favorite author: The Allure of Julian Lefray by R.S. Grey
  10. a book recommended by someone with great taste: Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur
  11. a book you were excited to buy or borrow but haven’t read yet: Faithful by Alice Hoffman
  12. a book about a topic or subject you already love: Glamour by A.L. Jackson, Sophie Jordan, Aleatha Romig, Skye Warren, Lili St. Germain, Nora Flite, Sierra Simone, and Nicola Rendell
  13. a Newbery award winner or honor book: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
  14. a book in translation: The Vegetarian by Han Kang
  15. a book that’s more than 600 pages: A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab
  16. a book of poetry, a play, or an essay collection: Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay
  17. a book of any genre that addresses current events: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
  18. an immigrant story: Lucy and Linh by Alice Pung
  19. a book published before you were born: Beauty by Robin McKinley
  20. three books by the same author: Double Team, Prince Albert, and Prick by Sabrina Paige
  21. a book by an #ownvoices or #diversebooks author: If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
  22. a book with an unreliable narrator or ambiguous ending: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
  23. a book nominated for an award in 2017: The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry
  24. a Pulitzer Prize or National Book Award winner: A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan