Weekly Update

In case you missed it, here are this week’s blog posts:

I’ve been reading:

Recently acquired:

1 thing this week:

  • I went to Coney Island and rode one of the oldest roller coasters that’s still running!

Song of the week:

It’s probably not any surprise that Taylor Swift’s new song is the song of the week…


How was your week? What’s the best thing you read or listened to? Anything interesting happening in your life? Let’s talk in the comments!

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Book Review: Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds
Rating: ★★★☆☆
Links: Amazon • TBD • Goodreads
Publication Date: October 24, 2017
Source: Borrowed

1 hour, 43 minutes

An ode to Put the Damn Guns Down, this is New York Times bestseller Jason Reynolds’s fiercely stunning novel that takes place in sixty potent seconds—the time it takes a kid to decide whether or not he’s going to murder the guy who killed his brother.

A cannon. A strap.
A piece. A biscuit.
A burner. A heater.
A chopper. A gat.
A hammer
A tool
for RULE

Or, you can call it a gun. That’s what fifteen-year-old Will has shoved in the back waistband of his jeans. See, his brother Shawn was just murdered. And Will knows the rules. No crying. No snitching. Revenge. That’s where Will’s now heading, with that gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, the gun that was his brother’s gun. He gets on the elevator, seventh floor, stoked. He knows who he’s after. Or does he? As the elevator stops on the sixth floor, on comes Buck. Buck, Will finds out, is who gave Shawn the gun before Will took the gun. Buck tells Will to check that the gun is even loaded. And that’s when Will sees that one bullet is missing. And the only one who could have fired Shawn’s gun was Shawn. Huh. Will didn’t know that Shawn had ever actually USED his gun. Bigger huh. BUCK IS DEAD. But Buck’s in the elevator? Just as Will’s trying to think this through, the door to the next floor opens. A teenage girl gets on, waves away the smoke from Dead Buck’s cigarette. Will doesn’t know her, but she knew him. Knew. When they were eight. And stray bullets had cut through the playground, and Will had tried to cover her, but she was hit anyway, and so what she wants to know, on that fifth floor elevator stop, is, what if Will, Will with the gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, MISSES.

And so it goes, the whole long way down, as the elevator stops on each floor, and at each stop someone connected to his brother gets on to give Will a piece to a bigger story than the one he thinks he knows. A story that might never know an END…if WILL gets off that elevator.

Told in short, fierce staccato narrative verse, Long Way Down is a fast and furious, dazzlingly brilliant look at teenage gun violence, as could only be told by Jason Reynolds. 

This is going to be a very short review, mostly because this is a very short book and I don’t have much to say. I finished this in one sitting but can’t help wonder if I missed something because I’ve seen so many rave reviews of this book on Goodreads and other blogs and I just… didn’t feel much of anything for it.

Objectively, I can tell you that the book is well-written. It’s a timely book about an important topic. It’s a very fast read. There’s nothing actually wrong with it, at least as far as I can tell. But it’s been a few weeks since I finished it and I still have no idea what to say about it. It’s pretty rare that I finish a book and can’t come up with one single opinion on it, but that’s what happened here.

Three stars because I don’t know how else to rate something that I have no strong feelings about.

#mm19: one sitting reads


Have you read Long Way Down? Is it on your TBR?
Let’s talk in the comments!

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Have you entered the MASSIVE BOOKCON GIVEAWAY yet? Find more info in this post or go directly to the giveaway here:

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books that feature neurodivergent characters

Happy Top Ten Tuesday!  Today’s theme is ten books that feature ___ characters, and I thought I’d deviate away from my norm for once.  I know that I usually write about really great romances or my favorite tropes or upcoming debuts that I’m really looking forward to.  Instead of the fluffy stuff, I thought that today I’d go for the heavy-hitting ten books that feature neurodivergent characters.

Representation is so important in literature, and I think it’s great that authors are making a conscious effort be more inclusive.  The ten books below include characters with depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, eating disorders, PTSD, and more.

If you’re interested in seeing my reviews for these books, navigate over to my review organization page!

⭐ Made You Up by Francesca Zappia
⭐ Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde
⭐ The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli

⭐ Some Sort of Happy by Melanie Harlow
⭐ A List of Cages by Robin Roe
⭐ More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera
⭐ All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

⭐ We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
⭐ The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland by Rebekah Crane
⭐ Long Way Down by Krista & Becca Ritchie

If you had to make a list of ten books featuring characters with a certain characteristic, what would it be?

How excited are you for SOME KIND OF PERFECT?!

“What we decide will inevitably shape the lives of our children.
​For better or for worse. We can’t foresee.”

​~ Connor Cobalt, Some Kind of Perfect

This epilogue to the entire Addicted series, as well as its spinoffs, had its release date officially announced today.  I don’t know about you, but I’ll be holding my breath until April 22, 2016.

Only a little over a month away!

More information here.

Book review: Long Way Down by Krista & Becca Ritchie

Goodreads   Amazon

It’s been a couple weeks now since I finished Long Way Down, and honestly I’m still pretty emotional. I had been looking forward to this book for months, but I scared to read it. It’s the end of an era (sort of), and there were rumors flying around that one of the main characters might die, people were speculating that something might happen to Ryke and/or Daisy, and there was generally just a feeling that something really dramatic was going to happen.

Now, let me make it clear: I trust these ladies completely. I am 110% convinced that I’ll love anything they write. But I was still scared that this book was going to break my heart.

Spoiler alert: It didn’t.

My heart is still whole. And it’s happy. Sure, this book has really sad parts. Terrible things happen. I cried. (More than once.) But this book is so good. It’s the perfect ending to Ryke and Daisy’s story.

That’s all I’m going to say in my review. Anything more and I run the risk of spoiling it for anybody who hasn’t read it or previous books in the series.

And I want to encourage everybody to read this series. (You can get the first book for free on Amazon.) It somehow gets better and better and better as it goes on. (You can see my ratings steadily increase, by the way.) I can’t wait for Some Kind of Perfect, Infini, and the Like Us series.

Of all the authors I first discovered in 2015, I’m most excited to have found Krista & Becca Ritchie.

 

Final rating:

★★★★★, of course.

For my 2015 reading challenge, I’m crossing off #22: a book that scares you.