Top Ten Tuesday: Characters who would make great leaders

Happy Top Ten Tuesday!  Today’s theme is ten characters who would make great leaders, which is super fitting for election day.

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First up we have Darrow from Pierce Brown’s Red Rising saga.  Do I remember a lot about Red Rising?  No, not really, which is one of the reasons that I still haven’t picked up Morning Star.  But do I remember that Darrow was awesome?  Yes, absolutely.

Next up is Starr from Angie Thomas’ bestselling debut, The Hate U Give.  Starr is put in an almost impossible position as the sole witness to her childhood friend’s tragic death.  Stuck between the expectations of her fancy prep school friends and the real-life implications of the shooting in her neighborhood, Starr has to figure out how to do the right thing without letting anybody down or creating any additional problems.

Then there’s Victor from V.E. Schwab’s Vicious, probably the most controversial pick on my list.  It’s true.  Victor’s a villain.  But this guy has serious leadership potential!  And, in his own way, he is the leader of his group of misfits.  (Side note: I cannot wait for the next installment in this series.)

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It’s been a long, long time since I read Peter F. Hamilton’s Void series and I honestly remember very little of it, but I do remember Edeard being a great leader.

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Both Rose Calloway and Connor Cobalt from Krista & Becca Ritchie’s massive Addicted/Calloway Sisters series easily make the list of great leaders. While Connor is logical, refined, and cunning, Rose is a perfectionist who wouldn’t hesitate to tear out the heart of her enemies (and look great while doing it).

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I’m maybe cheating with these last four picks since they actually are official leaders in their books, but next up is Prince Kai from Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles series.  It’s true that Kai starts out the series primarily as a love interest for Cinder, but as he grows up, he becomes a strong, morally sound leader who isn’t afraid to stand up for his people.

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I’m definitely cheating with Lady Jane Grey, who ruled England for nine days back in the 1500s.  I’m not sure if the real-life Jane Grey was quite as awesome as this fictionalized version, but the Jane from this book made an awesome leader.

And what about Alexander Hamilton?  The amount of attention this guy is getting now is insane.  There are so many books (above: Alex & Eliza by Melissa de la Cruz) written about him, a musical so popular that people wait months for tickets, and suddenly everybody is interested in his life. Why was he never president?

Finally, I’m going with Prince Rhy Maresh from V.E. Schwab’s Shades of Magic series.  While Rhy comes across as a flirty playboy as the series begins, he grows as a person and a leader as the series comes to its conclusion.

Who are your favorite fictional leaders?

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I loved more than I expected

Happy Top Ten Tuesday!  I actually forgot to post this last week, and I even had everything all ready to go!  Luckily for me, this week is a TTT hiatus, so I have another chance to post it.

Anyway, this topic is all about books that I loved more than I thought I would.  There was an option to do books that I disliked, but I figured I’ve talked about those enough!  I tried to go back in time since I feel like I’m always raving about the same few books.  I went way back to 2013 for this one, so I hope you enjoy!

Please feel free to send me any books that you’ve enjoyed more than expected and I’ll add them to my TBR!

The Help by Kathryn Stockett: I have a documented problem with bestsellers.

Margot by Jillian Cantor: Historical fiction about the Holocaust, however important it may be, is not my favorite topic.

In the Blood by Lisa Unger: I don’t read a lot of thrillers and I really like kids, so I don’t generally enjoy books about creepy children.

Stiff by BB Hamel: This was the first stepbrother romance I ever read and I honestly did not expect to like it even one bit.

Glitter and Glue by Kelly Corrigan: If I’m honest, I don’t generally love memoirs. Especially memoirs from people I’ve never even heard of before. But this was surprisingly good and it read like fiction, which helped a lot.

Marie Antoinette’s Head by Will Bashor: Although I was a huge fan of Sofia Coppola’s film about her life, Marie Antoinette’s hairdresser does not top my list of interests.

Lust is the Thorn by Jen McLaughlin: I really just requested this book for kicks, but even though I went to thirteen years of Catholic school and have never thought of a priest sexually before, this book was HOT!

The Odds of Loving Grover Cleveland by Rebekah Crane: As a rule, I’m generally skeptical of anything from Kindle First, but this book was honestly really great.

Seventh Heaven by Alice Hoffman: I only read this book because I needed something published in 1990 for 2015’s reading challenge and it was enchanting.

The Void Series by Peter F. Hamilton: I don’t read a lot of epic fantasy – like the real kind that spans universes and millennia – but Hamilton is one of my boyfriend’s favorite authors and I can clearly see why.

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When I first started The Dreaming Void, I wondered how any author, regardless of the level of skill or amount of talent, could possibly pull off a story like this.

There was so much going on – so many characters, so many plots – that I could barely keep it all straight in my mind. I couldn’t remember who Aaron was, or who Troblum was, what relevance there was to Justine and the Burnellis, how any of these characters could possibly be connected. My poor brain was swamped.

I didn’t believe that anybody could make this work, but I pressed on. (Mostly because I have an ARC of The Abyss Beyond Dreams sitting on my coffee table waiting for me, but still. I pressed on.)

It took awhile, but I finished The Dreaming Void. It was pretty good. Then I read The Temporal Void. I finally knew who all the characters were, so I enjoyed it a bit more. Then came this book,The Evolutionary Void.

Everything came together. Everything made sense. Every question I had was answered. I can’t even say anything about what happens in this book without spoiling the whole trilogy, but please believe me – it’s worth it. All 2000 or so pages. 

It’s worth it.

Final rating: